Thoughts Interrupt Practicing Meditation

I have a client who was having a struggle with practicing meditation.  Chris was saying she is working on a software program she is about to launch, and her mind is full of ideas and rapid-fire thoughts about the launch, which is great, except she is having a hard time meditating because she can’t seem to empty her mind of thoughts while trying to meditate. 

This isn’t just a challenge for Chris.  This happens to all of us who are practicing meditation.  If you’re an entrepreneur or a creative, maybe you’re a scientist or an engineer. This happens to all of us when our minds are in overdrive.  Having an active mind that is stimulated with ideas and details is naturally going to be a challenge if you’re practicing meditation.  That is more reason to take 20 – 30 minutes out of your waking day to clear the mind. 

It can also be a dilemma or real problem that you are trying to solve that seems to be getting in the way. This too, is more reason to take time to meditate, even when it seems hard.  There is no reason to feel bad or beat yourself up if you’re having a hard time meditating.  It’s something we all deal with at times.

There are many tricks to clear the mind, but the reality is, you must really want to meditate and be clear about your intent.  If you have a flash of an idea that interrupts your meditation, you can create a file box in your mind and file that idea in the mental file drawer to access later. 

Ultimately, you cannot keep trying to control your thoughts.  The mind will begin to quiet when we observe it, rather than trying to control it.    What it gets down to; do you really want to meditate more than you want to solve problems or create ideas?  Do you value the time you have set aside to meditate more than all the other issues?  Of course, this takes contemplation and reflection on the importance of spiritual practice.  

When through deep reflection, we find our time that we set aside to meditate is sacred and we gradually learn to just observe those thoughts, feelings, and ideas that arise during our sacred time and not try to control them.  Then gradually it becomes less of a struggle to commit to a regular practice.

In my experience, when I no longer judge the thoughts and feelings, but observe them I find my mind becomes quieter and fewer interrupting thoughts appear.   It becomes easier to set my intention to meditate and contemplate and be the observer and not be the judge. I find following this practice, I have more aha moments and creative ideas that arise throughout my day.

I can’t give you a formula or set of steps that will make it easy to practice meditation.  It’s really about intention and what we value.  I have the same struggles and sometimes I give into the flashes of ideas, but the more I practice being the observer, the easier it is to just be present and love the sacred time to empty the mind and just be.

Side note: If you’re interested in Guided Meditations or Self-hypnosis audios, visit my site at businessmeditations.com


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

thirteen − five =